Norwegian Meatcakes

Description

Want your grandmother's home cooking without all those calories? Try this recipe!

Ingredients

1⁄4TeaspoonPepper
1⁄4TeaspoonGround Nutmeg
1PoundGround Protein (Beef, Pork, Lamb, Turkey... whatever you want; be experimental. You can mix them as well.)
1 1⁄2TeaspoonOriginal No Salt (Can substitute with 1 teaspoon of Salt)
1⁄2TeaspoonGoya Brand Adobo Light
1⁄5TeaspoonGround Ginger
2 1⁄2TablespoonPotato Starch (Level the spoons, and make sure the potato starch is not packed into spoon)
3⁄4CupSkim Milk (Can substitute with water or dairy alternatives)
  Butter Flavored Cooking Spray

Instructions

Work the salt into the ground meat for a few minutes until it becomes tacky, using a food processor or a small dough mixer. Then, work in the spices and potato starch completely. Slowly add the liquid to the meat dough, a little bit at a time. Be sure that the liquid you have added has been absorbed into the dough completely before adding any more. Push the meat dough down from the sides of the bowl often to guarantee an even mix.

NOTE: You can make this dough anywhere from a few hours up to a full day in advance, though it is best to make it the same day.

Next, take a large cup or mug, fill it with warm water and put two table spoons in it. You will use these spoons to form round or oval cakes from the finished dough. Take one heaping tablespoon of the meat dough and form it into the shape either with both spoons, or with one tablespoon and your hand. This should yield anywhere from 16-18 equally sized cakes.

Brown the meat cakes in a pan on each side for about 2 minutes and 30 seconds over medium heat, with butter flavored cooking spray. If while cooking, they begin to take a triangular shape, cook the cakes on the third side as well.

Once browned on all sides, move the cakes over into a 12" saute pan with either the already made brown gravy, or a 1/2" even layer of warm water with low-sodium bullion, and let them sit fully covered for 10 minutes, not cooking. As these cakes sit, their flavor will develop.

Notes

These Norwegian Meatcakes are from a recipe that was handed down to me by my grandmother.  The only tweaks I made to this recipe to make it "work for me" was to use leaner proteins, a lower calorie homemade gravy, and using Kabocha squash as my side as opposed to the traditional boiled white potatoes. Other than that, everything else is exactly as she made it, down to the traditional spices and carrot-raisin side dish.

As plated in the picture, I served the Norwegian Meatcakes with finely shredded carrots with raisins, baked Kabocha squash and mushroom-onion gravy.